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Choreographer in Delhi
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What is a Choreographer?

Choreography is an artistic opportunity to express one's personality through the creation of dance. A choreographer designs and directs routines used in dances and performances. They love movement and the art of dance, but most of all love to inspire others by sharing their creative ideas.

What does a Choreographer do?

A career in choreography can be fun and fulfilling. A great deal of time is spent inventing, editing, and practicing routines in order to ensure that they meet the appropriate level of professionalism and provide entertainment for audiences and judges.

A large part of a choreographer's job is to make sure that the routine is pleasurable not only for the participants but for the audience and possibly judges, too. He or she must listen intently to the piece of music that is being used, and work out the timing and the feel of the different dance steps. A lot of time is spent inventing new dance moves and editing routines. They also work very closely with the dancers, teaching them by example and by spoken instruction.

A choreographer may spend weeks or months providing direction and encouragement to the dancers, directing practice, inventing and arranging the choreography, and of course making the necessary changes and tweaks to perfect the dance. Needless to say, there is endless practice involved. A choreographer needs to make sure that the dance is perfect for the audience to see.

Choreographers teach more than just dance steps, they also help actors and singersdevelop their characters, selecting rhythm and pacing to enhance their performances. Most celebrities have a choreographer to create their signature visual image. This makes them a huge influence on every aspect of the mainstream spotlight. Choreographers need to have a very keen sense of who they are as an artist, and also what their target audience needs to see.

The composition of dance is creative in the same way in which the composition of music is. The notation of dance, however, is a work of analysis and reporting, performed generally by people other than the choreographer, in language or signs that may well not be understood by the creator.

During the Renaissance, dance masters in Italy, such as Domenico da Piacenza, taught social dances at court and probably began to invent new ones or arrange variants of known dances, thus combining a creative function with their educational ones. Staged ballet employed the same steps and movements as social dance and differed from it principally in floor arrangement and visual projection.

In the 16th century, dance masters at the French court so organized the floor patterns and theatrical and artistic contexts of their social dances as to initiate a choreographic form, the ballet de cour. In the two centuries that followed, the gap between social dance and theatrical dance widened until ballet in the 19th century achieved a basically independent vocabulary.

The ballet master of this era, the choreographer, was an arranger of dance as a theatrical art. The giant of late 18th-century choreographic art was Jean-Georges Noverre, whose work and writings made the dramatic ballet, or ballet d’action, celebrated. In this, ballet incorporated mime as well as academic dances, giving expression to the dance by narrative and histrionic context. After Noverre and his contemporary Gasparo Angiolini, others developed this trend in various ways—especially Jean Dauberval in the realistic depiction of contemporary country folk, Charles Didelot in moving toward Romantic stage illusion and fantasy, and Salvatore Viganò in the dramatic use of the ensemble (choreodramma) and naturalness of tragic gesture.

The choreographers of the Romantic movement employed ballet, as codified by such masters as Carlo Blasis, chiefly in the ballet d’action theatrical forms of Noverre’s day or in opera divertissements (balletic interludes). The ballerina, her role heightened by the newly invented pointework (position of balance on extreme tip of toe), and the female corps de ballet both acquired new prominence. The choreographers who best developed the art of theatrical dance narrative were August Bournonville in Copenhagen; Jules Perrot, particularly in London and St. Petersburg; and Marius Petipa, who in St. Petersburg brought the spectacular classical ballet d’action to its peak in such works as The Sleeping Beauty, in which extended and complex suites of classical dance brought poetic and metaphorical expression to the plot.

Early modern dance in the United States introduced new elements of movement and expression; and in ballet the work of Michel Fokine emphasized more naturalistic styles and a more potent theatrical image than had Petipa’s ballet classicism. Since then, choreographic forms have varied between the poles of representation and abstraction.

Dance notation in the 20th century came to be concerned with basic movement as well as formal dance and was assisted by the invention of new systems of abstract symbols—those of Rudolf von Laban and Rudolf Benesh being the most influential. Labanotation was the first to indicate duration, fluency, or intensity of movement. Today, these systems and others continue to evolve rapidly, amplified by film and videotape.

Choreography evolved no less rapidly. Methods of composition vary radically—some choreographers using their dancers’ improvisations as raw material, others devising every movement prior to rehearsal. Merce Cunningham radically changed the context for choreography in his attitude to music and decor as coincidental (rather than collaborative or supportive) to dance, in his employment of chance methods in dance composition and organization, and in his use of nontheatrical performance space. He, George Balanchine, and Sir Frederick Ashton became the leading exponents of classical or abstract dance; but the latter two—like Martha Graham, Leonide Massine, Jerome Robbins, and others—also produced major representational works of choreography.

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